Installing and Configuring PC-BSD – Part 4

In this part of our guide, we begin with getting amarok – the player that makes playing the music you love easier than ever before – and looks good doing it – installed and running. Let us do it.

Installing amarok

To install amarok, download my script (amarok-build) and save it to your scripts directory.

Make it executable (open a terminal, cd scripts, chmod +x amarok-build) and execute it as root (su, enter root passwd and then ./amarok-build). This script will build amarok and install it.

When the script executes, an options box for amarok options will be displayed. For playback engines, select XINE else amarok will NOT play WMA files. Note that the AKODE engine crashes amarok at this time, so do not choose this. You can chose to include other playback engines as you fancy.

For other build options, select what ever you desire. As for MYSQL, amarok functions very well without it, so if you want to install MYSQL, it is your call. You can enable it if you really want to install MYSQL. I chose not to install it.

Click OK and then amarok will be built and installed. There is no need to manually place a menu entry for amarok as the port automatically does this. Logout and login back to KDE and you will find amarok as shown here.

Start up amarok by clicking on its menu entry and enjoy your music collection.

For those who want to install amarok from a PBI, there is no amarok PBI yet.

On a personal note, I do not use amarok – I listen to all my music and watch all my movies using kplayer which we built in part 1 of this guide.

Next we will get limewire – the best and the fastest p2p client on the planet – working.

Installing limewire

Note: Limewire depends on java so install java first before installing limewire. See part 1 of the guide to install java.

To install limewire, download my script (limewire-build) to your scripts directory.

Make it executable (open a terminal, cd scripts, chmod +x limewire-build) and execute it as root (su, enter root passwd and then ./limewire-build). This script will do the following:

  • Download the modified version of the build makefile and distinfo file from my site
  • Download the latest limewire source from my site
  • Build and install limewire

 This is necessary since the ports Makefile is for an older version of limewire that is no longer available. The script will replace the old Makefile and distinfo with the ones relevant to the new version, get the new limewire source and install it.

Let us add limewire to the KDE menu under Internet.

Open the KDE menu editor (K -Settings – Menu Editor) and add limewire as shown. Remember to save your menu entry before closing the menu editor.

Start limewire by clicking on the menu entry we just added. Remember, it takes about 2 minutes for limewire to initialize the limewire GUI. This is normal according to the FAQ. Once started, limewire is very fast in searching and downloading from the p2p network (gnutella). The application looks like this.

Limewire uses UPnP to connect through firewalls, so there is no need to make any changes to our firewall configuration. However, just in case UPnP does not work for you, then open port 6346 in both directions (IN/OUT) on your router/firewall.

There is no limewire PBI at this time.

Next we turn our attention to azureus – the best bit torrent client available.

Installing azureus

Note: Azureus depends on java so install java first before installing azureus. See part 1 of the guide to install java.

To install azureus, we will follow the method that we used to install OO in part 3 of this guide. We will install azureus using a pre-built package instead of ports. This is because azureus depends on eclipse which is a huge package to build and also because the pre-built version and the one in ports are the same. (version 2.2.0.2 instead of the latest 2.3.0.4)

We cannot install the newest version, since it depends on java version 1.5, for which the FreeBSD patches are still experimental.

To install azureus, open a terminal, su to root and execute the command: pkg_add -r azureus. This will fetch azureus with its dependencies and install it.

Let us add azureus to the KDE menu under Internet.

Open the KDE menu editor (K -Settings – Menu Editor) and add azureus as shown. Remember to save your menu entry before closing the menu editor.

Start azureus by clicking on the menu entry we just added.

Azureus uses UPnP to connect through firewalls, so there is no need to make any changes to our firewall configuration. However, just in case UPnP does not work for you, then open port 6881 in both directions (IN/OUT) on your router/firewall.

There is no azureus PBI at this time.

Here is a shot of azureus in operation.

Next we move on to installing streamtuner – the greatest interface to internet radio stations ever.

Installing streamtuner

To install streamtuner, download my script (streamtuner-build) to your scripts directory.

Make it executable (open a terminal, cd scripts, chmod +x streamtuner-build) and execute it as root (su, enter root passwd and then ./streamtuner-build). This script will fetch the latest version of streamripper, build it, install it and then proceed to build streamtuner and install it.

When the script executes, an options box for streamtuner options will be displayed. Select all the options and click OK. This will ensure that streamtuner is built with the full set of plugins.

Let us then create a directory to hold the songs ripped by streamripper. Open a terminal and as a regular user , execute the command: mkdir /usr/home/michael/SONGS/. Substitute your directory path in the command shown.

Let us add streamtuner to the KDE menu under Multimedia.

Open the KDE menu editor (K -Settings – Menu Editor) and add streamtuner as shown. Remember to save your menu entry before closing the menu editor.

Start streamtuner by clicking on the menu entry we just added.

Next customise streamtuner by clicking Edit – Preferences – Applications from the streamtuner menu and fill in the preferences as shown.

Substitute your directory path for /usr/home/michael/SONGS/ in the line: xterm -e streamripper %q -d /usr/home/michael/SONGS/ -r -q

Note: If you do not use kplayer but use xmms, then substitute xmms for kplayer in the preferences.

Now to listen to a particular stream, all we have to do is to right click the stream and select Tune in as shown. The selected stream will be played back using the player that you set in the preferences.

To record a stream to the hard disk, we right click the selected stream and select Record as shown. Streamtuner will then invoke streamripper to record the selected stream as shown.

To know more about the stream, we right click the stream and select Browse as shown. Streamtuner will then open the browser set in preferences to display more details about the selected stream as shown.

There is no PBI for streamripper and streamtuner yet.

This completes part 4 of the guide. We hope you enjoy using amarok, limewire, azureus and streamtuner and put them to good use. Stay tuned for part 5.

Written by Michael R.M. David.

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